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//researchbuzz.me/2015/10/26/uk-archives-fcc-echo-more-monday-afternoon-buzz-october-26th-2015/

“In early 2015, the Port of Los Angeles clandestinely closed its archival facilities and ended its program to preserve and protect its historic records. The historic resources were removed from the appropriate archival storage facility and placed in storage conditions that are inhospitable to any kind of records. The current facilities suffer from vermin infestation and are located directly adjacent to the water; the humidity is on any given day approximately 15-20 percent higher inside than it is outside the facility. The historic records are in immediate danger of being lost forever.”

Researchbuzz's link isn't working any more.

Update: From Google Cache:

"The Port of Los Angeles Archives Have Been Closed!
October 22, 2015
The Port of Los Angeles Archives were clandestinely closed in February and the program to preserve its historical materials has been terminated. 100+ years of Port and community history are in danger of being lost forever.

In 2010, The Port of Los Angeles, with the full approval of the Los Angeles Harbor Commission and the Port of Los Angeles Executive Director, began a program to identify, protect and preserve its historic resources.

An estimated 25,000 linear feet of historic materials have been identified, an enormous collection practically unknown to scholars and researchers. This includes operational records, accounting ledgers, maps, engineering blueprints, promotional material and assorted ephemera, many of which have been featured on this blog.

The enormous significance of this material cannot be understated. The maps and blueprints alone offer a unique representation of the communities that once thrived in and around Los Angeles Harbor: the Brighton Beach resort, the East San Pedro squatters (including Charles Lummis, a figure integral to LA history) and the Japanese American community that was wrongly removed from Terminal Island during internment. Several of the maps date to the 1880s and show Dominguez family lands, land parcels owned by the Banning Family, the Lower Reservation of Fort MacArthur (before demolition) and San Pedro & Wilmington prior to commercial development. There are also alternative design plans for Los Angeles Harbor, the San Pedro Waterfront, Cabrillo Beach and Terminal Island that were changed at the last minute or never fully realized.

The archives were previously retained in the former Coast Fishing Company Offices in Wilmington. By 2010, the building had been converted to a proper archival facility. This included climate controls, security in the form of storage rooms with keyed entry and space to process oversized historic materials such as maps.

In early 2015, the Port of Los Angeles clandestinely closed its archival facilities and ended its program to preserve and protect its historic records. The historic resources were removed from the appropriate archival storage facility and placed in storage conditions that are inhospitable to any kind of records. The current facilities suffer from vermin infestation and are located directly adjacent to the water; the humidity is on any given day approximately 15-20 percent higher inside than it is outside the facility. The historic records are in immediate danger of being lost forever.

Additional details can be found here:

//www.lavatransforms.org/video/port-of-los-angeles-archive/

The Port of Los Angeles prides itself on “social responsibility” but it has clearly fallen short of that ideal. If you want to make the Port live up to its responsibilities then please sign this Change.org petition:

https://www.change.org/p/los-angeles-harbor-commission-port-of-los-angeles-executive-director-gene-seroka-save-the-port-of-los-angeles-archives "
 

twoday.net AGB

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